Mapping Pathways is a multi-national project to develop and nurture a research-driven, community-led global understanding of the emerging evidence base around the adoption of antiretroviral-based prevention strategies to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The evidence base is more than results from clinical trials - it must include stakeholder and community perspectives as well.

17 January 2012

HPV vaccine may be beneficial to young women with HIV

via AIDSmeds

Young women living with HIV may benefit from vaccinations that protect against cervical cancer, according to a new study showing that many HIV-positive women averaging 21 years of age are negative for the human papillomavirus (HPV) types typically associated with tumors, according to a new analysis. These encouraging findings were presented at the 2nd International Workshop on HIV and Women, held January 9 and 10 in Bethesda, Maryland, and were reported by the National AIDS Treatment Activist Project (NATAP).

Two HPV vaccines are approved for use in the United States: Gardasil and Cervarix. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends them for all 11- and 12-year-old girls and all females between 13 and 26 years of age who have not been vaccinated or completed the three-injection series. The vaccines help protect against four HPV genotypes, two of which—types 16 and 18—are major causes of cervical cancer.

The effectiveness of HPV vaccination in women living with HIV isn’t known, with some experts suggesting that efficacy will be lower, on the assumption that many young women infected with HIV have also been infected with HPV genotypes 16 and/or 18. A clinical trial, conducted by the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, is being conducted to answer these questions.

Early results from the study, presented by Jessica Kahn, MD, of the University of Cincinnati and her colleagues, help answer one of these questions. According to her team’s results, most of 99 women enrolled to receive HPV vaccination were negative for high-risk HPV types.

Read the rest.

[Content that is linked from other sources is for informational purposes and should not construe a Mapping Pathways position.]

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