Mapping Pathways is a multi-national project to develop and nurture a research-driven, community-led global understanding of the emerging evidence base around the adoption of antiretroviral-based prevention strategies to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The evidence base is more than results from clinical trials - it must include stakeholder and community perspectives as well.

Loading...

01 April 2014

Mapping Pathways Launches NEW Report - "Community-driven strategies for the use of ARVs as prevention: United States Workshop Report"

The Mapping Pathways United States Workshop Report is launched today, providing the results of three HIV prevention scenario-development workshops held in 2013 in the United States.

The "Community-driven strategies for the use of antiretrovirals as prevention: United States Workshop Report" analyses, aggregates and synthesises different factors, issues, and drivers identified by workshop participants and constructs a future scenario for HIV prevention strategies using ARV (antiretroviral) drugs in the United States. Integration - of factors and systems involved in both treatment and prevention - is the main driver of success.

We hope you will read the report and utilize it in your organizational/jurisdictional planning processes for HIV prevention and care services. Please share the report with colleagues you think will be interested.

 In 2013, a subset of the Mapping Pathways team conducted knowledge-exchange workshops in San
Atlanta workshop participants
Francisco, Atlanta, and Washington, D.C., to further share the findings of our 2013 report ("Developing evidence-based, people-centred strategies for the use of antiretrovirals as prevention") and to continue enhancing the community-driven, locally informed approach to the wider evidence base for ARV-based prevention.

The cities were selected based on geographic diversity as well as the diversity of experience and expertise that can be found in each setting.

All three workshops included a mix of approximately 20 researchers, advocates, policy experts, public health officials, and service providers; they were diverse in terms of age, race, gender identity, sexuality, sero-status, and years in the field, with a blend of local to national experiences and perspectives.

Participants collaboratively developed a range of future scenarios and potential strategies linked to prevention programming goals and objectives. They were asked to think ahead to the year 2025, and envision an array of outcomes associated with the implementation of ARV-based prevention.

Based on participant ideas and concepts synthesised across all three workshops, we developed a ‘Mapping Pathways’ scenario for the future which has a strongly integrated approach at its core. The main driver of this future scenario is one of integration across political, economic, social, educational, and technological factors, and integration across the broader scientific, healthcare, and delivery systems. This means that we integrate both treatment and prevention strategies, including how we develop them, how we fund them, and how we deliver them, into one holistic approach.

Political and economic factors considered by workshop participants

The Mapping Pathways scenario was informed by these key themes common to all the workshops:

• Participants emphasised the need for a more holistic approach to HIV services in which prevention and treatment were not seen as mutually exclusive.

• Social and behavioral research must be supported and integrated with biomedical research.

• Digital web and device-based technologies and information sharing will affect access, uptake, and adherence.

• The Affordable Care Act (ACA) offers major opportunities for expanding access to healthcare, and poses challenges in HIV prevention and care delivery as the landscape evolves.

• Community-based organizations have a leading role to play in the new healthcare paradigm being ushered in with the ACA. They can help generate political will, drive research agendas, and deliver integrated care to communities and populations in need.

• Diversified funding streams are needed, and many of the optimistic scenarios generated by participants included strategies to engage a wide range of funders.

Click here for the United States Workshop Report.

[Please look for us on Facebook here www.facebook.com/MappingPathways and you can follow us on Twitter @mappingpathways as well.]

02 August 2013

IRIN Coverage of Mapping Pathways ARV-Based Prevention Report: “Here’s all this science - now what?”

via IRIN

 Excerpt:
According to Mapping Pathways, the ideal approach to implementing treatment as prevention should consider not only the clinical goal of efficacy (works in a lab), but also effectiveness (how to apply the solution in a community).

“I know that if you get anti-retroviral drugs into someone’s blood, they suppress the virus. We have amazing proof of that - it’s a major scientific breakthrough in the history of humankind,” said Linda-Gail Bekker, chief operating officer of the Desmond Tutu HIV Foundation, based in South Africa.

“But now we have to put this together so it works, which means engaging with a wide range of human beings who live very different lives than those of us who run these programmes might imagine,” she said.

Effectiveness requires behaviour change and, therefore, varies across cultures, governments, and communities based on “the firms that produce the drugs, the healthcare clinics that deliver the drugs, the community centres that provide education, and the partnerships developed,” according to Mapping Pathways.

“Human beings will behave like human beings. What does that mean? Well, social sciences have been trying to figure that out for centuries and don’t have one single theory, so why should our HIV programmes?” asked Bekker.

“The notion that in HIV programmes `one size fits all’ has backfired on us and it has been a humbling moment for those of us who work in this field.”

Read the whole article on IRIN.


[Please look for us on Facebook here www.facebook.com/MappingPathways and you can follow us on Twitter @mappingpathways as well.]

30 July 2013

Podcast: Mapping Pathways' San Francisco "Knowledge Exchange Workshop" - More Robust, Better Resourced Behavioral and Implementation Science is Needed!


Jim and Jessica from the Mapping Pathways team have podcasted again!

This new 12-minute podcast (click to listen) was produced by AIDS Foundation of Chicago (a Mapping Pathways partner) and is the fourth in a series of discussions inspired by our new report "Developing Evidence-Based, People-Centred Strategies for the Use of Antiretrovirals as Prevention."

In this new podcast,  Jim and Jessica talk about the recent Mapping Pathways "Knowledge Exchange Workshop" at the beautiful San Francisco AIDS Foundation which included researchers, public health officials, policy experts, advocates, and prevention staffers from the Bay Area. Our report provided the backdrop - and the launch pad - for rich discussion/debate and a series of future-thinking exercises focued on ARV-based prevention strategies and scenario planning. The above pic is an "action shot" from the workshop.

Big take-aways from our two days together include the need for more robust (and better resourced) behavioral science and implementation projects - and for advocacy devoted to both these areas. We have vaccine advocates, microbicide advocates, treatment advocates, PrEP advocates.... it's about time we have some concerted advocacy for behavioral science and implementation science too! Without more attention and adequate funding for these activities - it won't matter how efficacious a biomedical tool proves to be in a clinical trial. Things like PrEP, etc.  need to work in the REAL world - which a clinical trial does not accurately represent .

Here are the presentation slides used during the workshop.

Other podcasts

Click here for previous podcasts on topics like PEP and PrEP.

And please stay tuned for future podcasts on topics like microbicides, the use of treatment for prevention, and more. Feel free to leave comments or questions here, on the podcast itself, of by sending an email to mappingpathways@gmail.com. [Content that is linked from other sources is for informational purposes and should not construe a Mapping Pathways position. Please look for us on Facebook here www.facebook.com/MappingPathways and you can follow us on Twitter @mappingpathways as well.]

29 July 2013

Archbishop Desmond Tutu: If we are to toss AIDS into the dustbin...

If we are to toss AIDS into the dustbin, we must do our best to understand the intersections of scientific discovery and community wisdom, address the truths in both, and move forward with decisions that take into consideration a full, robust interpretation of the evidence base.
- Archbishop Desmond Tutu
These are extraordinary times in which we are living. More than three decades into the global HIV pandemic, discussing ‘the end of AIDS’ is more than a rhetorical flourish, more than political grandstanding, and more than wishful thinking.

At this very moment, we have ‘the end of AIDS’ in our collective sights in a way we have never had before. Even as the epidemic continues to wreak havoc in the lives of far too many of our precious daughters, sons, sisters, brothers, mothers, fathers, friends and colleagues across the world – new and exciting scientific discoveries are pointing to a future where AIDS is a brutish artefact of history.

Science has shown us that treating HIV-positive people with a combination of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) is not only good for the individual being treated, but also imparts a prevention benefit for the broader community as well. People on successful treatment do not get sick and die, and are much less likely to pass their infection to their partners.

Science has also shown that ARV drugs provided to HIV-negative individuals can protect them from the virus if exposed, much like anti-malarial drugs prevent malaria. And there are new, user-friendly ways to deliver ARVs being developed and tested at this very moment.

We simply must take the critical next steps to end AIDS now that science proves it can be achieved. If enough global citizens, people of faith, members of the private sector and world leaders summon the courage to accelerate and increase their investments in the global response to overcome AIDS, we have a very good chance of containing the worst viral scourge the world has ever known.

Conducting research in India, South Africa and the US, Mapping Pathways has taken such a step, one that helps make ‘real-world’ sense of the incredibly dynamic nature of the science. With new discoveries and insights coming so quickly it is hard to keep up.

Much like politics, all science is local. The understanding of what this new science means is local. Its utility is local. Yes, we have compelling results from clinical trials, and make no mistake, we will have more. But the opinions, perspectives and lived wisdom of communities, from the grassroots to the grasstops, matter just as much as the peer-reviewed scientific data that are coming at us fast and furiously. How communities absorb, understand and prioritise the science matters.

Placing a premium on a ‘people-centred’ interpretation of the science, Mapping Pathways has tapped the smarts, and the hearts, of advocates, researchers, clinicians, policymakers, pharmacists, funders, public health workers and people living with HIV. The results of their journey are illustrated in this monograph. I hope these findings will help communities across the globe grapple with the promises, and the marked complexities, of this thrilling new prevention paradigm in which we find ourselves.

I recommend Mapping Pathways – Developing evidence-based, people-centred strategies for the use of antiretrovirals as prevention. If we are to toss AIDS into the dustbin, we must do our best to understand the intersections of scientific discovery and community wisdom, address the truths in both, and move forward with decisions that take into consideration a full, robust interpretation of the evidence base.

Let us map new pathways together, for our generation and for those who follow. Let us be the generation to make the difference.

Let us be done with AIDS.

-Archbishop Desmond Tutu

[This is the foreword penned by Archbishop Desmond Tutu in the new Mapping Pathways report "Developing evidence-based, people-centred strategies for the use of antiretrovirals as prevention."  Click here for podcasts, an infographic, and a video associated with this report.]


[Please look for us on Facebook here www.facebook.com/MappingPathways and you can follow us on Twitter @mappingpathways as well.]

11 July 2013

NEW Podcast on the Promise of PEP, and the Unfortunate Lack of PEP Implementation


Jim and Jessica (pictured above) from the Mapping Pathways team are back with a new podcast - and this time the topic is PEP - post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention.

This 12-minute podcast (click to listen) was produced by AIDS Foundation of Chicago (a Mapping Pathways partner) and is the third in a series of discussions inspired by the new report "Developing Evidence-Based, People-Centred Strategies for the Use of Antiretrovirals as Prevention."

In this new podcast,  Jessica Terlikowski and Jim Pickett discuss the promise of PEP, and the unfortunate lack of strong implementation that characterizes this intervention in nearly every part of the world.

Other podcasts

Click here for a previous podcast in which Jessica and Jim  introduce the Mapping Pathways report (published by Mapping Pathways partner RAND) and explain its relevance for multiple audiences. Click here for their second podcast where they chat about PrEP - pre-exposure prophylaxis.

Please stay tuned for future podcasts on topics like microbicides, the use of treatment for prevention, and more. Feel free to leave comments or questions here, on the podcast itself, of by sending an email to mappingpathways@gmail.com.

[ Please look for us on Facebook here www.facebook.com/MappingPathways and you can follow us on Twitter @mappingpathways as well.]